Human Development and Family Studies seeking research participants

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies is seeking research participants for various studies relating to the development of individuals and families across the lifespan.

Faculty research areas in our department cluster in the following areas: Risk, Resilience, and Developmental Psychopathology; Treatment, Intervention, and Prevention Science; Emotion, Regulation, and Relational Processes; and Adult Development and Aging.

To find more information about the studies below you can visit our research participants opportunities page. You can also contact us at HDFSResearch@colostate.edu.

Adult Development and Aging Studies

Several faculty focus their research on emerging adulthood and development in midlife and the later part of the lifespan, as well as intergenerational family relationships. Developmental processes include healthy aging, awareness of age-related change, cognitive, and self-regulation changes across the adult years.

Exploring chronic pain for two people with pain

The Promoting Healthy Aging and Families Research Laboratory is seeking participants for a study that is testing a unique intervention of gentle exercise and education for pairs who experience chronic pain. You can participate if you are an adult who experiences chronic pain, and so does your caregiver, or you are an adult who experiences chronic pain, and so does the person who provides care to you. Participants will receive a up to $100.

Participate in an NIH-funded study promoting strategies for successful aging

The Adult Development and Aging Project (ADAPT) research team is currently looking for participants to be a part of a new clinical trial based on a recent successful pilot program. Participants will receive monetary compensation for their time commitment to the study, up to $280.

Understanding the experiences of older adults moving into senior housing

The Health, Emotion, and Aging Research Team (HEART) is recruiting paid research participants to be part of our Relocation and Transitional Experiences (RELATE) study. The team is seeking adults 50+ who are preparing to move into a senior housing facility. Participants may be compensated $300 for completing all study procedures.

Learning how daily experiences are linked to health and well-being across adulthood

The Health, Emotion, and Aging Research Team (HEART) is recruiting paid research participants to be part of our Health and Daily Experiences (HEADE) study. They are seeking adults (18-35 years old or 60+ years old) of European American or Latinx/Hispanic descent to participate. Participants may be compensated up to $200 for completing all study procedures.

Activate your Mind – EEG Study

The Healthy Cognitive Aging Lab is looking for adults 60 years and older who have limited piano experience. They will be asked to wear an EEG headset, which measures brain stimulation during the session. Then they will complete fun activities like word search puzzles and learning to play the piano. Participants will receive a $15 gift car for the 1.5 hour session.

To find more information about the studies, visit our research participants opportunities page.

Emotion, Regulation, and Relational Processes Studies

Socioemotional processes are a focus of HDFS faculty research (e.g., emotional development; attachment) as are various aspects of regulation, including self-regulation and emotion regulation. Such processes are essential to school readiness and success, which is a common thread of several faculty research programs. Relational processes include a focus on parenting, family caregiving, and family/school linkages.

Teen focus group about stress, mindfulness, and stress management 

The Family Relations and Development Laboratory is inviting teenagers 14-18 years old to participate in a mindfulness group program that has been shown to reduce stress and improve health. Teens will provide feedback on a technological supplement to this intervention and will earn $10.

Couple communication study

The Family Relations and Development Laboratory is seeking couples 18 and older to participate in a communication study. Participants can earn up to $60 for 1.5 hours.

Parent-child relationship study

The Emotional Attachment and Emotional Availablity Lab is recruiting mothers and/or fathers with a child between the ages of 0-14 years to participate in a project, which evaluates the effectiveness of a brief program to enhance the quality of parent-child relationships. 

To find more information about the studies, visit our research participants opportunities page.

Risk, Resilience, and Developmental Psychopathology Studies

Faculty pursue research programs related to why at-risk individuals have favorable outcomes, processes related to developmental psychopathology and atypical development, the nature of risk-taking behaviors, and developmental disabilities.

Skill building for infants with Down syndrome

The Developmental Disabilities Research Laboratory is studying skill-building activities designed to help infants 4-18 months of age with Down syndrome develop important early problem-solving skills, called goal-directed behaviors. In older children, goal-directed behaviors are skills that help children complete everyday tasks in their home, school, and community environments.

Cognition in children and adolescents with Down syndrome

The Developmental Disabilities Research Laboratory is studying the best ways to measure cognition in children and teens with Down syndrome.

Early childhood communication outcome measures for Down syndrome

The Developmental Disabilities Research Laboratory is studying the best ways to measure communication skills in young children with Down syndrome.

Learning the needs of adoptive parents

The Emotional Develpoment Laboratatory is studying the experiences of parents who adopted children with trauma histories, so that they can improve services to those parents.

To find more information about the studies, visit our research participants opportunities page.

Treatment, Intervention, and Prevention Science Studies

Most faculty in HDFS are concerned with translational research: How to devise effective intervention and treatment strategies that are based on empirical evidence and careful program evaluations. Such endeavors encompass school-based programs, substance abuse prevention for youth and treatment for young adults, Extension programs, interventions that promote work/family balance, and evaluations of family therapy. Policy analysis also is a key part of prevention science.

CAMP Teen Pregnancy

The Adolescent Wellness Lab seeks pregnant teenagers ages 13-19 who may be at risk for gaining too much weight during pregnancy. The study involves one screening visit, six 1-hour twice-monthly sessions or usual care, and follow-up visits within three months of having the baby.

United for Health/Unidos for la Salud

The Adolescent Wellness Lab seeks LatinX families to take care of a series of focus groups that address the prevention of type 2 diabetes in LatinX youth in Northern Colorado.

The MIND (Mood and INsulin resistance for Diabetes prevention) Research Project

The Adolescent Wellness Lab seeks teenage girls ages 12-17 for a 6-week group program to find ways to prevent type-2 diabetes. Teens who take part get up to $665 to thank them for their time.

To find more information about the studies, visit our research participants opportunities page.